Age Attribute 1

The first thing we're looking at is the dominant technology. In the beginning of the Industrial Age, what we had was the harnessing of energy to help the individual do things that an individual couldn't do.

We were using coal and oil, we were using steam to essentially augment the human strength that was there to do things that an individual couldn't do. We're harnessing energy to allow people to do things they couldn't do on their own.

Basically, what we were doing was harnessing the energy to do things. What you saw in the beginning of the Industrial Age was a huge engine. It usually was driven by either coal or oil and generated steam.  It used a paddle or flywheel, attached usually by leather belts to augment human power, to make it go around.

Essentially, decay in energy was due to the length of the belts that were away from the energy source. You were losing energy as things were going along. What you had is one engine supporting the whole industrial complex. You had a one to many relationship, a relatively simple, understanding and activity that was going on. Fast-forward in the Industrial Age and the invention of the electric motor. This radically changed the productivity and the flexibility, or using a current buzzword, agility.

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Dana Baer
Age Attribute 2

In the Internet Age, the icon was the microprocessor. The miniaturization of power, space per bit, in other words, allowed us to pack more and more horsepower in moving bits around in the microprocessor. In the upcoming Information Age, I've coined the term InfoBit. It's going to be a unit of power that provides us with a baseline understanding of the worth of this new thing that's out there, the power. Saying “I’ve got 16 InfoBits” is just like saying “I have 420 horsepower or 110 horsepower” or I have a “1.2 GB processor or 1.7 GB processor.”

We will have a different measurement criteria that's not response time network availability. It's something that is different that is about information, not about just the distribution.

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Dana Baer